Nosework Next Steps

Next Available Course
Starting Friday November – date tbc, 7.30pm
Venue: St Aidens Church Hall, Maungaraki
Cost: $120 inc GST
The intermediary class between Introductions and our ongoing Advanced group who meet weekly. Next Steps takes the teams who have started some nosework skills – either with us or elsewhere and adds more challenges as they move to a confident “Odour Only” alert response. Over 3 sessions we introduce all the elements encountered in “real-life” detection work including exteriors, interiors and vehicles while improving each team’s ability to solve the searching problems they are set.

Nosework Advanced Session

Thursdays from 7.30-9pm

Regular Venue: St Aidans Church, Cnr Poto Rd and Stratton Street, Normandale
Cost: $30 per session

This ongoing and socially supportive group meets weekly. Conquer new challenges with outdoor, vehicle and more advanced searches. Ideal for those considering entering  actual Nosework Trials or wanting to extend their Introductory training into more “real-life” challenges. Completion of Nosework Introductions or equivalent scent work with another organisation experience a pre-requisite.

Nosework Next Steps

Next Available Courses
Commences Friday 9 June at 7.30pm
Three-week course held 9, 16 and 30 June
Cost:$120

Continue developing your dog’s unique sense of smell and their skills at identifying and alerting on a special odour wherever it might be placed. Further develop your teamwork and handling skills in this new sport. This course will be specifically for dogs who have already completed a Nosework introductory course and understand the basic principles. Dogs with “issues,” or physical disabilities are welcome as each dog works with the handler alone and need not be comfortable in group situations. Nosework Next Steps is a three-week class ( 90 minutes sessions) and expands the odour recognition work begun in earlier Nosework classes to other environment and scenarios. Graduatesd are then invited to join the ongoing Advanced Nosework sessions on Thursday evenings. .

Puppy Primer

Next Available Courses:
Sunday’s – held on behalf of   Central Allbreeds Dog Training School
Click the links to find out more and sign up via their websites.
A five-week group class for the older puppy offering age-specific training and qualified development advice. Positive socialisation experiences with people and other pups.  Introduces loose lead walking, recalls, wait and stay, basic commands and how to manage off-lead interaction for your rapidly growing puppy.  Class size is limited for more individual attention. Ideal for puppies up to 20 weeks of age at class start. Family involvement encouraged. A practical and positive solution to start your puppy’s education, help with housetraining, common puppy problems and early training skills.

House-Training The Older Dog

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When it comes to house-training an older dog many of the same concepts apply as with a puppy. The difference is often you are trying to undo a more rehearsed behaviour, rather than establishing a new one and so it may take a more regimented approach – especially at first.

It also pays to eliminate any medical issues – not only bladder infections that might result in incontinence but also your dog being on prescriptions with a side effect being excessive urination or sudden bowel movements.

You need to be consistent about meeting the dog’s physical needs and have a good set of plans in place to cover the general situations that arise day to day.

We can housetrain dogs because they instinctually don’t soil a den. An untrained adult doesn’t understand that where our den is. So we teach them our whole house is a den and set them up to go in the right place on cue by:

  1. Limiting access to small areas of the house – one room or one part of a room.
  2. Anticipating needs – times that they will want to go and take them there yourself.
  3. Making the act of going in front of you a rewarded one – both treats and freedom.
  4. Keeping a simple diary/chart of the times they go out – so family predict needs better.

PLAN ONE – For while the dog is the focus of attention—say in the lounge with you (but not when you have attention focused on something else).

Anticipate the times they will need to relieve themselves—just like babies—after waking, after meals, after intense activity, after long drinks. And take them out to the place you want to use. Sorry but you must go too—not place them out and shut the door. Keep them on a lead at first so there is a focus on the task, not a play time in the yard. Be a tree as much as possible so they are attracted to sniff and get on the task.

Have a cue ready to say quietly as they are actually going at first. After a few days try saying it as you get outside in anticipation of action. I recommend 3 treats for success—after all it makes me three times happier! Now they have earned freedom and can be let off lead too.

If there was no action within 5 minutes (even when on lead) then take the dog back inside and confine them as per plan two for 10-15 minutes before you repeat the process.

PLAN TWO –  This is when you will be distracted and for short term confinement. A crate is seen by many dogs as a kind of indoor den and should be placed in a “people place” so they are not isolated. Other options are a tether attached to the skirting by a bed, baby-gating an alcove, an Ex-pen with bedding laid down or attaching a lead to your belt as you move around.

PLAN THREE – For when you go out or longer periods alone. This is about being realistic and is best if different from the short term option—move and then open the crate door and put paper down in a small easy-clean room or create an outside pen and kennel and leave them there.

PLAN FOUR – For when you find an “accident” in action – interrupt the dog with a sharp noise/spray and propel them outside – put on lead. If you didn’t see it, then you are too late! Be grumpy at the cleaning, not the dog. Growling now or rubbing their nose is cruel and most likely teaches the dog to seek better privacy—in the next room or behind the sofa.

I recommend clean-up with lots of water, then mild detergent and vinegar rinse. Enzymatic cleaning products are best for removing stubborn odours.  Do not use NOT Ammonia-based products like HandyAndy. These attract the dog to mark again over top. Some citronella deterrents can be sprayed to discourage remarking or a liberal dose of white pepper on a carpet spot discourages the dog from returning to one place at least.

Meal time routines for your puppy

Getting the right routine established for your puppy or dog to follow at meal times is an easy way for anyone in the family to convey leadership- especially to a young dog. Yes you can eventually teach a puppy to wait or stay  just by holding them back, but this is not the most efficient technique nor is it the recommended method used by good modern trainers. Instead we advocate working on teaching the puppy self-control. To get what they want (permission to eat) they learn through patience, not pushiness. With this technique even pre-schoolers, under close supervision, can be involved in a daily routine.

How do you achieve this? Initially the bowl is a guide to get your pup to sit by moving it above their head so they look up as you say a cue “sit.” Then introduce “Wait” or “Stay” Your other hand might also add a “wait” cue by making a stop sign as you start to lower the bowl towards the ground on the other side of your body. Then if the puppy remains sitting (say as you lower to waist height) mark the good behaviour with a “Yes” and give the puppy something FROM THE BOWL. Lift it above their head and start again – going lower over several repetitions until it gets to the ground and you would let the puppy know they can have the jackpot with an “Okay” or “Eat.”

But if they get up as the bowl is lowered then immediately lift it back over their head and say sit/wait. Like a see-saw as puppy’s butt lifts off the ground the bowl comes up out of reach and above their head. But if the butt stays on the ground the bowl gets lower. Once this is familiar with adult family members let the youngsters also practice.

With puppies it is also recommended that feeding is done inside – in the kitchen or near the hub of family activities. This is to help avoid resource guarding issues later – since it becomes clear to then no-one wants to steal their food and activity or movement around it can be ignored. Adding an extra tidbit as you pass sometimes adds an even better association. Then as the pup grows if it is necessary to change routines the basics are properly put in place.

 

Behaviour Consultations

Appointments Available
Due to current committments Jan is not taking on new clients, except by referral, at this time
Location: In-Home
Cost: Initial session charge $320. The first session is 90 minutes, and includes an option for a 30 minute follow-up session via Zoom. Additional travel charges may apply depending on location. Additional options and packages for further training are available.
Enquire Here

Not all problems can be resolved with attending a group class. There are times when your dog’s issues would be best addressed by working with you and your dog alone, perhaps in your own home. Following the completion of a behavioural questionnaire, the initial consultation with an experienced, qualified behavioural trainer is supported by written materials and tailored notes to help find a solution best fitted to your dog’s needs. Common issues we address by private consultation include house-soiling, destructive behaviour, barking, fence running, fearfulness and on-lead aggression to name just a few.

Puppy visits

Next Available Course
As arranged. Time slots available Monday-Friday.
Cost: $80-$90 per 1-hour session at your home or online.
Inquire Here
An opportunity to tailor the basics of a good puppy upbringing to your own situation. Home-based advice on housetraining, chewing, nipping and biting, play and early training. Perfect for the new puppy owner to iron out any specific questions, to help younger family members to be involved, get early training underway, or as part of the preparation before your new pup has actually arrived.

Take the Lead Training

Next Available Course
Please register your interest below to discuss availability. Due to current committments we will not be taking on new clients until after Easter
Location: In Home
Cost: $90-$110 per session conducted weekly for 6 weeks.
Register Inquiry
Let the experts come to your home and train your dog for you. A better solution for training issues when you are too busy or struggle trying to make progress yourself. Take the Lead Training packages will kick start a better relationship – teaching your dog to walk nicely on a lead, come back when called, wait nicely while visitors arrive, or help work on problematic phobias, fears, or aggressive behaviour. Conducted weekly or over a condensed period to fit your needs. Package options include a handover session to pass on achievements, so you too enjoy the benefits of your dog’s new training skills.

Nosework Introductions

Next Available Course
Starting – Monday 8 April, 7.30pm.
Venue: St Aidan’s Church Hall, Normandale
Cost: $180
 
Does your dog follow its nose? Tap into your dog’s unique sense of smell and have fun teaching them Detection Dogs skills, but in a pet-focused context. This class is suitable for ALL dogs of any age – even those with “issues,” or physical disabilities. Each handler and dog work alone and so need not be comfortable in group situations. This Introductory course runs over four weeks with an opportunity to continue into more advanced training by following on into a Next Steps course and then joining our Advanced Nosework group on Thursday evenings thereafter. Enrol Here